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october

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

It’s time to speak up about breast cancer, and the month of October is dedicated to doing just that. As the most common form of cancer, it’s likely that someone in your life whom you care for deeply has been diagnosed with breast cancer. Given how prevalent breast cancer is and the repercussions it has on individuals and families affected, this month is a time to rally together and raise awareness about it.

october breast cancer

Breast Cancer Statistics

In the United States, more women die from breast cancer every year than any other form of cancer. It’s currently estimated that 1 in 8 women in their lifetime will be diagnosed with an invasive form of breast cancer. Two of the greatest risk factors of getting breast cancer are female gender and older age, though men and younger women can get it as well. The statistics are alarming, and a diagnosis can feel daunting and isolating, whether it’s yourself or a loved one or family member who is receiving it. Fortunately, breast cancer research continues to thrive, which has led to improvements in screening processes and treatment success. These improvements have been given some of the credit for the slightly decreased death rate from breast cancer over the past several years. In order to take further advantage of the strides we’ve made in battling breast cancer, we must continue to educate our communities about the screenings and treatments available.

breast cancer stats

Self-Monitoring for Changes

While there is no way to guarantee prevention of breast cancer, it is recommended that all adult women perform a breast self-exam monthly. This is a great way to self-monitor for any changes or abnormalities that may occur in the breast tissue. As you age, this becomes an even more important habit as age is one of the main risk factors. It is important to note that not every growth or lump felt in the breast tissue is a cancerous mass. Some non-cancerous masses are abnormal but do not grow outside of the breast tissue. While these lumps do not innately pose a risk, some of these growths can increase a women’s risk of getting breast cancer down the road. Any abnormality or change in your breast tissue that you notice or feel should be examined by a health professional immediately. Just under half of women diagnosed with breast cancer were diagnosed after noticing a lump during a self-exam, so the importance of this routine cannot be overlooked. In addition to regular self-exams, maintaining a healthy weight through exercise and a nutritious diet is another important way to reduce your risk of breast and other cancers.

Receiving a Breast Cancer Diagnosis

Should you receive a diagnosis of breast cancer, take the time to find a team of doctors whom you are comfortable with and trust with your care. This team can include an oncologist, or cancer doctor, a surgical oncologist, a radiologist, a case worker, a registered dietician who specializes in cancer nutrition and possibly several other specialty providers. These individuals will be with you, alongside your personal support system, to make sure you receive the best care available from diagnosis on. Treatments and interventions will differ depending on the type of breast cancer you are diagnosed with and your doctors will help you navigate all of the options and should use their expertise to recommend the best course of action. Make sure you feel comfortable asking questions and engaging in your treatment plan. Your providers have the knowledge and the skill sets to provide excellent care, but it is just as important that you feel included in the decisions being made and prepared for the treatment road ahead.

breast cancer ribbon

Raising Awareness

Whether you are young, old, male, female, part of a high-risk category or not, it is our shared efforts in spreading awareness this month of October and all months following that will successfully raise awareness, education, and resources about breast cancer to every individual diagnosed and every family and friend supporting them. As a society working together, it is within our reach to decrease breast cancer diagnoses within our communities and to improve the outcomes and survival rates of those diagnosed.

Sources

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American Cancer Society

BreastCancer.org

National Breast Cancer Foundation, INC.

Breast Cancer Survivors – A Cut Above the [Breast]

As a survivor of breast cancer, few will understand the struggle you endured, but many acknowledge and honor the strength it took to carry on.

breast cancer ribbon

Alongside the relief and celebration that comes with completing treatment and hearing the long-awaited word “remission” may come a host of other emotions. Some of them may not be as positive. You may feel fear of the cancer coming back or anxiety about not seeing your treatment team as often. Surgeries and treatments can alter the way you feel about your body. These emotions are natural after what you’ve been through, and it’s important to know that you’re not alone and that you have resources at your disposal to live your life as fully as possible following recovery.

Listen to Your Doctor

After completing treatment and entering into recovery, it is important to abide by your doctor’s recommended follow up care. This care often includes checkups every few months for the first several years after treatment. As your cancer-free time increases, the frequency of appointments can begin to decrease. If you had breast-conserving surgery to include a lumpectomy or a partial mastectomy, it is recommended that you get a mammogram 6-12 months after surgery and radiation and continue to get them annually for monitoring. Pelvic exams may also be included in your follow up care as some of the hormone drugs can increase your risk of endometrial or uterine cancer. Another test that may be done, especially if you have gone through menopause, is a bone density scan. Monitoring your bone health will be a priority for your doctor especially if your cancer treatment included drugs that can reduce bone density.

women in pink

Focus on Your Mental Health, Too

Battling cancer and enduring the challenges that come with treatment can leave you feeling exhausted. It can be challenging to find the energy to keep up with follow up care, knowing that it will be a crucial part of your life as a survivor. Express any concerns or anxiety or overwhelm you are feeling about your continued treatment and monitoring with your doctor. Collaborate with them and let them help you feel more in control when it comes to your checkups. Equally important as your medical team is your support system. Continue to lean on the individuals who supported you through treatment, whether it be family, friends, a loved one, a support group or a therapist. Support systems can often help to shoulder some of the burden when it comes to remembering appointments, driving to procedures, and encouraging you to continue doing the things you love outside of your healthcare.

breast cancer ribbon tree

Everyone’s Experience is Unique

Every single individual’s experience with surviving breast cancer is unique and special. You will have your own thoughts, feelings, challenges and success that you overcame and that you will continue to experience as you embrace a heightened awareness of your health for the rest of your life. Beyond this, you are an example of hope and strength for others who are fighting their own battle against breast cancer. Continue to spread awareness this month and every other so that we can continue to win more of these battles.

Sources

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American Cancer Society

Cancer.net

World Mental Health Day

With a big initiative to provide education and resources to improve the physical health of more people around the world, the mental health of our society cannot be overlooked in achieving this goal. World Mental Health Day, which falls within Mental Illness Awareness Week, is a dedicated day that is honored globally once a year. While mental illness must be acknowledged and supported 365 days of the year, World Mental Health Day is a dedicated time during which the world comes together to raise awareness, increase support, and decrease the stigma surrounding mental illness. Each year Mental Illness Awareness week focuses on a specific theme, and the theme for 2022 is ‘Make mental health and wellbeing for all a global priority’. In doing so, the health and wellness of our society as a whole can be substantially improved. Mental Illness Awareness week runs from October 2nd through October 6th this year. Several important days during this week include the following:

Tuesday, October 4th – National Day of Prayer for Mental Illness Recovery and Understanding

Thursday, October 6th – National Depression Screening Day

Monday, October 10 – World Mental Health Day

mental health day

What is mental health?

Everyone has mental health. It’s the way we feel inside, good or bad, to include our emotions, feelings, mood and more. While the emphasis of health is usually placed on the physical, mental health has an incredible impact on what we are able to do, ranging from our ability to socialize, go to work, provide for others, and take care of ourselves. It allows us to participate in and contribute to society. Similarly, our mental health can be impacted by countless things. Our work situation, home life, physical health, friends and family, financial state, even our genetics and the way we were raised, or an event that happened many years ago can play a role in determining the state of our mental health. Good mental health supports the way we work, learn, grow and interact with others. When our mental health is good, we are more resilient to the inevitable stresses of life. Even in times of good mental health come moments of sadness, despair, and struggle. These moments are a normal part of life and can even teach us how to overcome things in the future. However, sometimes these situations are too much for us to tackle on our own, and the impact they have on our mental health requires support. No one is too strong or too brave to be immune from these life events. It is better to reach out sooner rather than later when you feel like sadness, despair or negativity are consuming your days and preventing you from living your life so that you can work to restore your mental health.

Who does mental health impact?

Anyone, from any age group, race, gender, background or belief system can suffer from mental illness. Sometimes it can be challenging to differentiate between a bad day or a tough month from a mental illness, as there is no official test that can definitively tell us what is happening. Whatever you are feeling though is valid and could ultimately lead to more serious mental health consequences. Your thoughts and feelings should be acknowledged and supported and evaluated by a professional. Varying degrees of mental illness will require varying levels of support and treatment. Consider if you have noticed any of the following signs or symptoms listed below. This list is not comprehensive but does address many of the signs and symptoms that occur for some of the major mental illnesses. If you experience any of these things regularly or consistently, or notice a loved one or friend who may be experiencing them, reach out to a professional.

Signs and symptoms:

– Excessive worrying or fear

– Feeling excessively sad or low

– Confused thinking or problems concentrating and learning

– Extreme mood changes

– Prolonged or strong feelings of irritability or anger

– Avoiding friends and social activities

– Difficulties understanding or relating to other people

– Changes in sleeping habits or feeling tired and low energy

– Changes in eating habits such as increased hunger or lack of appetite

– Changes in sex drive

– Difficulty perceiving reality

– Inability to perceive changes in one’s own feelings, behavior or personality (”lack

of insight” or anosognosia)

– Overuse of substances like alcohol or drugs

– Multiple physical ailments without obvious causes (such as headaches, stomach

aches, vague and ongoing “aches and pains”)

– Thinking about suicide

– Inability to carry out daily activities or handle daily problems and stress

– An intense fear of weight gain or concern with appearance

The impact of mental health on our society

The impact that mental health and mental illness have on our society is huge. Consistently, research shows that individuals with mental illness have a shorter lifespan.1 in every 20 adults experience serious mental illness every year, yet only two thirds of those individuals receive treatment. Some of the major mental illnesses that individuals are struggling with in order of prevalence are anxiety disorders, major depressive episodes, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), bipolar disorder, borderline personality disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), and schizophrenia. As millions of individuals across the globe are directly impacted by a mental illness of their own, just as many are indirectly impacted as they witness a loved one, a friend, a coworker or a neighbor struggling with a mental illness. The impact of mental illness goes beyond the individual it is affecting to interfere with the lives of many around them. Therefore, it cannot be on the individuals alone who struggle with mental illness directly to support and treat themselves. Our communities must band together to support those who need awareness raised and treatments provided.

mental illness awareness week

Raising awareness and increasing support

The stigma that mental illness is a weakness or can be overcome by mental toughness leads to many individuals trying to keep their struggles quiet, ignoring their feelings, or resisting help, which only makes things much worse. Like any physical ailment or chronic illness, mental health must be addressed and treated in order to make recovery possible. This is only one of the many stigmas surrounding mental health. Others include societal stigmas such as viewing individuals with mental illness as violent, dangerous or crazy. Self-stigma, or the beliefs held by individuals with mental illness, can lead to lack of reporting or seeking out treatment out of shame or due to fear of society’s response. In order to decrease societal and self-stigma surrounding mental illness, we must normalize the reality of mental illness and continue to have conversations about it. Increasing discussions and public awareness, as well as making support more accessible to everyone, is crucial in order to increase mental illness reporting and mental illness treatment.

You can help to decrease stigma and raise awareness in your own community! Show your support this year by talking to friends, family members and coworkers about Mental Illness Awareness Week and World Mental Health Day. Post about it on your social media, advocate for improving treatment access for mental illness, and continue to educate yourself on the topics of mental health. Together, we can better support our community!

Sources:

Image 1 – https://sdgresources.relx.com/special-issues/world-mental-health-day-2021-0

Image 2 – https://www.siouxcenterhealth.org/latest-news-and-blog/tag/mental-illness-awareness-week/

American Psychiatric Association – https://www.psychiatry.org/patients-families/stigma-and-discrimination

National Alliance on Mental Illness – https://www.nami.org/get-involved/awareness-events/mental-illness-awareness-week

https://www.nami.org/About-Mental-Illness/Warning-Signs-and-Symptoms

Rethink Mental Illness – https://www.rethink.org/get-involved/awareness-days-and-events/world-mental-health-day/

Mental Health Foundation – https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/our-work/public-engagement/world-mental-health-day

https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/explore-mental-health/about-mental-health

Sepsis Awareness

Think back through your lifetime, and you can likely recall a time during which you experienced an infection. Virtually everyone has. We often brush off the minor ones, such as a small cut from gardening or a burn from cooking dinner, either of which could become infected. We also occasionally are burdened with the more serious ones, like appendicitis or pneumonia, which tend to force our attention. The truth is though, almost every infection can lead to sepsis, even the ones that start off as seemingly no big deal. In recognizing how common infections are, it is imperative that we understand what sepsis is, who is susceptible, and how it can be prevented and treated in order to save lives.

What is Sepsis?

Sepsis occurs when the body begins to damage its own tissues in response to an already existing infection. This can become life-threatening as the inflammation becomes widespread and blood clotting reduces blood flow. When sepsis is prolonged without treatment, it turns into septic shock. Septic shock is characterized by a severe drop in blood pressure leading to organ damage and death.

sepsis map

Who is at Risk?

Although anyone can get sepsis (remember, it starts with an infection, and almost everyone gets one, if not many, infections throughout their lifetime), there are certain populations that are more susceptible. These populations include the very old (sixty-five years and above), the very young, pregnant women, patients being hospitalized, and individuals with pre-existing infections and medical conditions. These individuals already have compromised or altered immune systems, making it much harder for the body to fight off infections, even ones that may seem minor. The inability to fight off the initial infection leads to widespread inflammation and blood clotting.

Sepsis is Not Rare

Though serious and frightening, sepsis is not rare. Approximately 1.7 million Americans are diagnosed with sepsis yearly. Roughly 30% of individuals diagnosed with sepsis do not survive. One in three patients in the hospital who acquire sepsis die. Though sepsis requires immediate medical care, the infection that causes sepsis starts outside of the hospital in nearly 87% of cases.

Because infections that develop into sepsis often start outside of the hospital, it is important to recognize which ones have the potential to do so and what the best prevention measures are. Sepsis is most commonly caused by bacterial infections, but can also result from fungal, viral or parasitic infections. Common types of infections that lead to sepsis include infections of the abdomen, such as appendicitis or peritonitis, infections of the central nervous system, infections of the lungs, such as pneumonia, infections of the skin, and infections of the urinary tract, such as urinary tract infections (UTIs). Some of these infections are harder to recognize than others. General sepsis prevention measures to practice at all times include good hand hygiene, keeping cuts, wounds and burns clean, staying up to date on recommended vaccines, seeking routine medical care, especially for chronic conditions, and seeking medical support for suspected infections, especially if you or a loved one fall into one of the susceptible populations.

sepsis chart

Recognizing Signs and Symptoms

Though prevention is key, signs and symptoms of sepsis are important to recognize so you can seek immediate treatment should you experience them. They include high heart rate and low blood pressure, fever or hypothermia (low body temperature), shaking, chills, clammy skin, disorientation or confusion, and hyperventilation (fast breathing) or shortness of breath. Quick diagnosis and treatment is crucial for improving survival rates, so these signs and symptoms must be taken seriously and addressed immediately. If you or a loved one experience any of these symptoms, find in-person medical treatment or at a minimum, call your doctor with your concerns for further guidance.

Infections are common and must be taken seriously due to the risk of sepsis. Remember to practice your prevention measures and be diligent about seeking treatment should you suspect you are experiencing symptoms that could point to sepsis.

Sources:

Image 1: https://www.cdc.gov/sepsis/what-is-sepsis.html

Image 2:

https://www.cdc.gov/sepsis/pdfs/Consumer_infographic_four-ways-to-get-ahead-of-sepsis_printonly_508.pdf

Cleveland Clinic: https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/12361-sepsis

Mayo Clinic:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/sepsis/symptoms-causes/syc-20351214

CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/sepsis/prevention/index.html

Person’s meditating hands in a grassy field

Importance of Self-Care In Grief

We all grieve differently, but one thing remains true for everyone: the importance of taking care of yourself. Whether you’ve found yourself in a state of just going through the motions or you’ve put all your focus on taking care of your loved ones, it can be easy to put your own needs on the back burner when facing the loss of a loved one.

However, it’s absolutely imperative that you take time to focus on yourself, too. In honor of Mental Health Awareness Month, we are discussing the importance of self-care throughout the grieving process.

Mental Health Awareness Month

Mental Health Awareness Month dates all the way back to 1949 when the National Association for Mental Health (now known as Mental Health America) first organized the observance in the month of May to help raise awareness and lessen the stigma attached to mental illness.

For a long time, society looked at mental illness as being just one thing. There was always a negative stigma attached to the term, and people often thought of those living with a mental illness as having ‘gone mad’. However, that is simply not true. Over time, we’ve learned more about the many layers and types of mental illness.

Mental illness is the term used to describe mental health conditions that impact a person’s mood, thinking, and behavior. Common mental illnesses include:

How Grief Impacts Mental Health

Losing a loved one can be a traumatic experience. You may feel as though you lost a part of yourself and that your life will never be the same. While there is some truth to this, it’s important to remember that you are still here and must go on living your life.

“We don’t move on from grief. We move forward with it.

–          Nora McInerny

Feelings of sadness, anger, loneliness, and hopelessness are all common throughout the grieving process. However, these feelings can sometimes develop into chronic grief which can in turn become a mental illness. In some cases, grief can lead to depression.

Symptoms of chronic grief can include:

How Self-Care Improves Mental Health

Self-care used to be thought of as bubble baths and pampering yourself, but there is much more to self-care. Just like the grieving process, self-care can look different for everyone. But the overall concept is to take care of yourself physically, mentally, and emotionally.

To take care of yourself physically is pretty simple: eat a well-balanced diet, drink plenty of water, exercise regularly, and practice healthy hygiene habits. However, taking care of yourself mentally is a little less cut and dry. This is where it really differs from person to person. To take care of yourself mentally and emotionally, you need to take time to do the things that make you feel good and happy. Hobbies are a good place to start when focusing on taking care of yourself mentally. Maybe you enjoy sitting outside and reading a good book, maybe you are an artist, maybe you enjoy taking long walks with your dog. Whatever it is that leaves you feeling happy and fulfilled, do it!

Research shows the more you practice self-care, the more confident, creative, and productive you are. This also leads to experiencing more joy, making better decisions, building stronger relationships, and communicating more effectively. Overall, you will be in a better frame of mind, making you a better version of yourself. This is not only good for you, but it’s also good for those who depend on you.

When you take time to take care of your whole self (physically, mentally, and emotionally), it will help you to process your feelings of grief in a healthier way.

How Hospice Can Help You in Your Grief Journey

Always remember that you do not have to face the journey of grief alone. Lean on friends and family to help you through. Don’t be afraid to talk about your feelings. Sometimes we feel the need to be strong for those around us. If this is the case and you would feel more comfortable talking to someone outside the family, lean on the support of your hospice bereavement team. Our kind, compassionate bereavement coordinators are always available to talk or just listen. Never hesitate to reach out.

If you or someone you love is struggling with their feelings of grief and would like to talk to one of our bereavement coordinators, please contact us at (619) 450-4414.

Collage of people

Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

By: Anonymous

May is Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Month, a time to learn about and celebrate the rich histories and cultures of Americans from the Asian continent and the Pacific Islands. The AAPI population is remarkably diverse, with 24 million people tracing their roots to over 30 countries. Many different cultures mean many different beliefs and traditions regarding the passage from life to death.

Demographic research reveals that AAPI Americans are less likely to access hospice and palliative care than other groups. Asian Americans, for example, have been shown to use fewer end-of-life services. Studies attribute this to cultural beliefs, language barriers, attitudes about death, and family-centered decision-making. But good hospice and home care can meet these challenges.

Respecting Differences

We recognize that the AAPI community has diverse attitudes and practices surrounding illness, hospice, and death.

Although some AAPI practices are widely shared, such as respecting elders, using white and yellow colors, and burning incense, some practices vary. Chinese and Korean values can require the family to keep vigil by a dying loved one. The Chinese tradition, however, may maintain a hierarchy within the family structure, while the Korean tradition might maintain the division of genders. In other AAPI traditions, individuals, like expectant mothers, are discouraged from visiting someone at their end-stage of life for their own protection. In addition, some cultures place great value on a loved one being cared for in their own home at the end of their life.

Apreva Hospice understands that these spiritual practices can, and should be, honored. We’re here to accommodate by providing professional, competent, caring, in-home service that maintains sensitivity to these values. 

Personalized Care Informed by Cultural Respect

Care goes beyond medical support. We are prepared to and can help you and your family with the hospice and bereavement journey with sensitivity toward AAPI’s religious, spiritual, cultural, and personal beliefs. This respect extends beyond rites and rituals and into practical care. The Native Hawaiian belief that spiritual essence (mana) is in all parts of the body can, for example, influence feelings about organ donation or cremation. But awareness of this belief informs our good care for a Native Hawaiian in the end stage of life.

The AAPI population is growing. By 2050, AAPI will become nearly 10% of the total United States population. It’s important that they can get the end-of-life care they need. Our staff ensures that everyone in our care, their family, and their loved ones are treated with respect. 

Some Eastern philosophies view death as part of a cycle in which a loved one’s passage serves as a reminder to celebrate the miracle of life. Our team celebrates the lives of the people we care for, and what makes each of them unique. We’re proud to join this month’s celebration of Asian and Pacific Islander American Heritage Month. We invite interested AAPI Americans to learn about our hospice and in-home services, confident their culture and traditions will be honored.

Close up of hospital sign

On National Hospital Week and Every Week, We Thank You!

By: Anonymous

We invite all community members to join us to recognize National Hospital Week, May 8 to May 14, 2022. Here’s more about this yearly observance and how we honor it at Apreva Hospice.

What Is National Hospital Week?

National Hospital Week is observed every year during the week that includes May 12, Florence Nightingale’s birthday. Florence Nightingale is best known for founding modern professional nursing and demonstrating the importance of nurses and their roles in the healthcare community.

Established in 1953 by the American Hospital Association, National Hospital Week highlights and recognizes hospitals and healthcare workers and the many innovative ways they support their communities.

Thank You For All You Do

Our team understands how challenging and demanding the hospital setting can be. We want to thank physicians, nurses, social workers, discharge planners, aides, and all other clinical staff members who have supported and cared for our patients and communities over the past year, especially given the unique ongoing challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic. Your hard work, long hours, and dedication to your communities have helped improve the quality of care for thousands of people in need.

Partnering With Hospice Care

As a leading hospice treatment provider, Apreva Hospice extends extra thanks to hospitals that partner with hospice providers. Your care and services have dramatically improved the quality of life for terminally ill patients and their families. In addition, you have given our team the opportunity to help these families save on hospital-related costs and deliver highly personalized care that helps them fulfill their loved ones’ final wishes.

We look forward to continuing our relationships with hospitals that partner with hospice treatment providers and are confident that together we can handle any unforeseen challenges that may come our way. In honor of National Hospital Week, thank you.

Elderly stroke patient and their caregiver

Hospice Eligibility for Stroke Patients

Some of the most common misconceptions about hospice care involve when it’s appropriate for a patient to elect hospice services and what diagnoses qualify a patient for hospice. People often assume hospice is only for cancer patients, but that is simply not true. You may be surprised to learn that stroke patients also qualify for hospice services.

What is a Stroke?

Strokes are the number five cause of death and a leading cause if disability in the United States. A stroke is defined as a disease that impacts the arteries leading to and within the brain. It occurs when a blood vessel that carries oxygen and nutrients to the brain is either blocked by a clot or ruptures. When this happens, part of the brain cannot get the blood and oxygen it needs, causing it and brain cells to die.

Stroke Warning Signs

The American Stroke Association uses F.A.S.T to help us identify warning signs of a stroke.

F = Face Drooping

If one side of the face is drooping or numb, this can be a common sign of a stroke. One way to help to determine this is by asking the person to smile. If their smile is uneven, that is an indication of face drooping caused by a stroke.

A = Arm Weakness

Another sign can be if one arm feels weak or numb. Ask the person to raise both their arms. If one arm drifts downward, it could be a sign of a stroke.

S = Speech Difficulty

Slurred speech is a third sign of a stroke.

T = Time to Call 911

If someone is showing these three warning signs of a stroke, call 911 immediately.

Other Signs and Symptoms

Other signs and symptoms of a stroke can include:

Stroke Risk Factors

Given the danger of strokes, it’s important to understand the different risk factors, including both those within and out of your control.

Risk Factors You Can Control

Some risk factors of stroke are within your control. These can include:

Risk Factors Beyond Your Control

As with anything else, some stroke risk factors are beyond your control. These can include:

Hospice Qualifiers

Hospice can benefit patients who are in the terminal stages of a stroke. The following criteria could be indicators that it may be a good time to consider the additional support of hospice.

If you are still unsure if your loved one qualifies for hospice, or if you have any questions about hospice for stroke patients, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

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